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assume that the national government must at all costs remain support of the four slave states within the union. those in light blue. so called loyal border states, delaware, missouri, maryland and especially kentucky top do that, he believed, the republicans must not an antagonize those states politically powerful slave holders. antagonize them by interfering with slavery in the succeeding states at least not interfering with them anymore than necessary. lincoln was sure that if he did otherwise the slave holders would pick up and leave as well. second lincoln assumes that only a small minority in the succeeding states really support succession. he and other republicans believe that the great majority of white southerners in the confederacy. slave holders and nonslave holders alike. loyal abiding citizens who had been tricked in to suck us is suggestion by a minority of extremists. leaving slavery alone would hopefully, win them back in to the union. that is the expectations. but after a full year of war, and despite lincoln's efforts to spare their property and feelings, precious fe
nation's history, it was the states rather than federal government that controlled access to religious worship, the rights of religious organizations and so on. and in the early decades of the 20th century, that began to shift as the supreme court applied the national constitutional establishment and free exercise clauses of the first amendment against the states sort of centralizing debates about religion. >> host: but if the states had the control, we had it written into our constitution, freedom of religion. >> guest: we did, indeed. but the first amendment begins "congress shall enact no law." so it was addressed only to the national government. >> host: were there restrictions by different states on religion? >> guest: oh, yes, there were. several states had religious establishments. most states limited the amount of property a religious organization could own. some taxed religious property. others banned given groups' practices. i'm thinking, for example, eventually various states in the southwest banning polygamy, for example. >> host: so when it came to massachusetts, talk abou
. it'll continue for about 90 minutes. there'll be a panel on improving government performance. we'll have it live for you here on c-span2. yesterday and today johns hopkins university in baltimore has been hosting a summit on reducing gun violence. speakers have included new york city mayor michael bloomberg and maryland governor martin o'malley. this afternoon at 4 eastern they will hold a news conference to release their recommendations for stemming gun violence. we'll have live coverage here on c-span2. again, that will be at 4 p.m. eastern. >>> and right around this time to have year every year governors address their state legislatures on the state of their states. laying out the priorities for the new year. tonight at 7:30 we'll take you live to the kansas statehouse for an address by the state's governor, sam brownback. that'll get underway at 7:30 eastern. >> he had been talking about this dream that he had had. he had talked about it for years, you know? the american dream. and that had become his dream. and he had been in detroit just a few months before, and he had talk
we want to be the most talented entrepreneurs in america. we have to make sure the government becomes a partner to the federal gunman becomes a partner of the american people. right now, the presentation i have heard in the last month, or two, in america right now, the inability of cities to do proper transportation planning, law-enforcement planning, investments, because we want to know not only what is happening one year from now but 90 days from now. it is not there because we have got to get our fiscal house in order in washington, d.c., and we are excited about it. >> the mayor of columbia, south carolina, a democrat, and the vice president of the u.s. conference of mayors. gentlemen, thank you for being here. guest: thank you. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] >> next, we will show you presidential inauguration speeches. in 1981, ronald reagan was nominated as the 40th president. the former california governor won the election against the incumbent, and at issue was the iran contra crisis, whe
's it for "the five." >> bret: should a government drowning in a sea of red ink take on more help to victims of the superstorm sandy? that is a battle right now on the floor of the house of representatives. this is "special report." ♪ ♪ good evening. i'm bret baier. right now, behind me, the house is engaged in a battle that serves as a microcosm for epic struggle of the nation's soaring debt. on one side, the president, democrats and some republicans from the region affected who want to spend billions helping storm victims. on the other, other republicans who say much of the money many this latest bill is targeted elsewhere. and that any funds should be offset with cuts. chief congressional correspondent mike emanuel has update tonight from capitol hill. good evening,be mike. >> reporter: good evening. with debt and spending expected to be the major fight for much of the year, today it is disaster relief money for the northeast following sandy. that is in the middle of the struggle. >> tragedy like hurricane sandy shouldn't be used as an excuse for a grab bag of spending having nothing
supporter of the royal government and was driven out of town. >> on the other side of that, with now is so a different source of media we can to fact check them how often direct lies in order to gain support or to turn people directly to one side or the other? >> well, i mean, you are definitely finding exaggerations, whether it was drastic or not, what i was interested in finding was that a lot of newspaper accounts came with disclaimers pics of the publishers, these printers very much valued reliable sources. and if the source was questionable, they would frequently print that with the article from some sort of disclaimer. >> i remember there was a letter that was published after the battle of lexington and concord that talks about the british soldiers coming to the parsonage in lexington and rampaging through and killing the barnyard animals. that never happened. there's a letter about the battle of bunker hill that says that general howe, as soon as the soldiers reached charlestown can seldom try tried to desert and run away, and he had to them strung up immediately on greasy. that did
and government reform committee. host: good morning. house members have returned to washington with votes slated later today for emergency aid for victims of superstorm sandy. new york is poised to become the first state to act in response to the mass shooting in newtown, connecticut, keeping guns out of the hands of the mentally ill and banning assault weapons. president obama has in hand to the recommendations from joe biden on gun-control and will push for action. the front page of the washington journal says president obama escalates the fight on the w economy. is the debt ceiling negotiable? your thoughts? send us a tweet or post your comment on facebook. you can also send us an e-mail. president obama held his last official news conference of the first term yesterday in the east room of the white house. here's what he had to say on the debt ceiling debate. [video clip] >> republicans and congress have two choices. they can act responsibly and pay america's bills or they can act irresponsibly and put america through another economic crisis. but they will not collect ransomed in exchange for
's the author of this book, "the spirit of compromise: why governing demands it and campaigning undermines it." president gutmann, are we a politically compromised? >> guest: we were created in compromise. a lot of people think of the revolutionary war, which separated us from our mother country. but if you recall -- i know you weren't there then, but if you recall historically speaking our founding fathers crafted a compromise that created the constitution. they were as polarized as any set of americans have been throughout our country and our history. they were pro-and anti-slavery and the compromise. so yes, we were founded in compromise, that today compromises become more difficult than ever before. >> host: what do you mean when you talk about the uncompromising mindset? >> guest: we live in an era characterized as a permanent campaign, where everyday is election day in campaigning and election may make for uncompromising minds. you stand in your principles, mobilize your base, drawing endless amounts of money. 20 for seven new site will cover his politics is that it's a horserace and th
government not to take actions that could jeopardize those still being held but the algerians have a long history with jihadist and they have shown they won't let hostage takers get out alive. >> we'll head back for breaking details. thank you. >> turning to the u.s. economy. consumer sentiment at the lowest sentiment for more than a year. reuters survey showed 35% of consumers have a negative reaction to fiscal cliff negotiations. the dow finished up 54. the s&p 500 gained five. the nort nasdaq lost one. there is word tonight that republicans may be willing to give a little now to get something back later. we are talking about the debt ceiling. versus spending cuts. chief congressional correspondent mike emanuel reports on the house g.o.p. winter retreat in virginia. >> at the house g.o.p. retreat in williamsberg, virginia, the leaders decided they will pass three-month temporary increase to give them time to finalize a budget. speaker boehner said before there is long-term debt limit increase a budget should be passed that cut spending. the house g.o.p. whip hinted at the strategy. >> o
." this inauguration ceremony marks a new beginning, a new dedication within our government, and a new spirit among us all. a president may sense and proclaim that new spirit, but only a people can provide it. two centuries ago, our nation's birth was a milestone in the long quest for freedom. but the bold and brilliant dream which excited the founders of this nation still awaits its consummation. i have no new dream to set forth today, but rather urge a fresh faith in the old dream. ours was the first society openly to define itself in terms of both spirituality and human liberty. it is that unique self-definition which has given us an exceptional appeal, but it also imposes on us a special obligation to take on those moral duties which, when assumed, seem invariably to be in our own best interests. you have given me a great responsibility--to stay close to you, to be worthy of you, and to exemplify what you are. let us create together a new national spirit of unity and trust. your strength can compensate for my weakness, and your wisdom can help to minimize my mistakes. let us learn together and lau
that they almost have to move were also much of their income is going to go to the government. gerri: us take a look at those numbers. his state tax will go to a 13%. that is a state income tax which means he will pay an additional 2 million in taxes. that doesn't even include the federal increase in taxes that we talk so much about the end of last year which would go to a 39 and a half%. this is a fella who has a net worth of 150 million, making money every single year. he will have a very big tax tab. >> absolutely. >> absolutely commit to the point where he is probably going to have to either move to another state income-tax state or have to move to the caribbean or move out of the estates. gerri: what is that? >> essentially, any place where an athlete place, within their jurisdiction they have to file taxes. so across all sports respectively they have to file in the state where they actually play in the game. any type of income that they receive based of their contract they have to file. the government wants their money. gerri: you were mentioning where he might go. take a look at the hi
and the rest of the world. we can only build on science. you have to work with government supporters business, parliamentarians, with any stakeholder that understands and is willing to engage in education and managing risk for the future. the first product to the first idea that people that got together in the early parts of the decade serenade instrument for international cooperation. that is key here. they started working on what became the framework for action. i hope at least 10% of you have heard about this. maybe. i'm used to it not being very familiar, but i'm also very used to that people now ascendant when we start describing it. the framework for action was sick to duration of the previous details. there have been neo, strategy, which was strongly science-based, so there's other strategies, but the new strategy was really about globalization. it was really setting a framework for what outcome, both leinster to shoot goals and priorities in the sense of the people who put this together on the site thinks he will be in a safer a safer world. the adoption of the framework for action ha
that govern guns and ammo with executive orders. but this weekend republican senator lindsay graham says an executive order like that would have bipartisan opposition in the congress. one of the gop officers in the senate explained why. >> he said a day or two ago he didn't think the senate would be voting on the gun legislation. that doesn't mean the president has the right to go beyond the constitution. >> this morning's announcement who wrote letters about concerns. it was 33 days ago. >> peter doocy reporting for us live this morning. >> this gun debate is a big talker this morning as well. last night on "hannity" things got very heated during a debate over the new york state gun law that just passed yesterday. >> hannity going head to head about democratic state senator over the state's new regulation. >> you tell me how this law makes it safer for a stay at home mom or maybe a woman who lives at home after a divorce because of a restraining order how does that make them safer? >> it makes it harder with the person with the restraining order against them to do damage to this woman.
repairs on the national on the association's hand that governs the national mall so that is a virtual cross when we come to it but there's a number of civic minded things we will be able to do if we are lucky enough to have access funds when it said and done. >> whoever can address this how many law enforcement agencies and officers will be involved in the security on the date of the inauguration and also how large an area will be closed off with street closures? >> for stila to apologize for saying it was morning when i was actually afternoon. but to answer your question we cannot go into detail as far as how many law enforcement officers will be present for the inauguration. can you repeat the second question for me? >> [inaudible] >> i can't go into detail unfortunately. >> -- area closed off. >> we have road closures and effectively to talk with you after words to provide you with those. >> [inaudible] >> with all events that happened on the capitol complex, we train constantly to address them. as far as specific threats, i can't answer that right now. but just know myself -- boug
in government today. marcia mcnutt has worked with me for many, many occasions, most notably during the oil spill. you're looking at one of the fine leaders that worked with the government to make decisions matter and make the difficult decisions. i'm proud to work with her during the oil spill and i'm proud to introduce her now. marcia? >> thank you. the gulf coast is under threats and in particular, i want to speak of those that impact life and property. it is a deadly combination of loss of natural protection, rising seas from global warming, increasing intensity and number of storms, and more people and critical infrastructure that lies in the coastal zone in the path of those storms. there's no doubt but the coastal zone is a desirable but it is a dangerous place to live and it is getting more dangerous all the time. so what is the solution? well, the good news is that research can help. let me provide you with an analogy. we know that fault zones are dangerous places to live but thanks to science we have increased more than two orders of nag any attitude the safety of living in earthq
get government to work and get good things to happen. you can overpower the extremists with intelligence and with reason and with common sense. and you can make this state a safer state. >> the national rifle association responded late today to new york's actions. they put out a statement saying naturally that they are outraged by what new york has done. it should also be noted that the nra is frequently outraged. but other states are looking to join new york. maryland governor martin o'malley, colorado governor john hickenlooper, connecticut governor dan malloy, illinois governor jack markell have all announced in the past few days announced ambitious legislative proposals on gun reform in their own states. and of course federally, tomorrow ahead of schedule, president obama is set to unveil his own set of proposals in response to the newtown school shooting. the white house releasing this picture today of vice president biden, presenting his findings to the president and other cabinet members in a gun policy meeting. >> i can tell you that tomorrow the president and v
and the government programs and medicare and we are going to have to go back and do this every couple of years but we have to study what works and put more of the policies that are working in place. we have to deal with our other entitlement. it's a contentious issue in this country. it's always a political tough battle. but the longer we wait to make the changes for the people the difference of the programs there is no question about that and we have to go forward with tax reform which is great when you talk about it broadly we all know the tax code is a disaster and none of us like the tax code. when you talk about the ability to broaden the base, lower the rate and raise revenue, that is a pretty good system. it's pretty desirable to think about how to reform the tax code. but there are a lot of tough things when you talk about the specifics and the fact we need to deal with the mortgage deduction for state and local taxation then capping the discretionary you don't have to talk about a single specific policy. taxing the 1% is easy even if you are the 1% its current take more of that to fix the pr
to that, it is almost entirely health care? >> well, there are examples throughout the federal government where the dollars are not spent wisely. we ought to treat it as other people's money because it is the money earned bit taxpayers and we have an obligation to make sure that we don't continue the wasteful ways of washington. we intend in the house of representatives to promote an agenda that allows for getting spending under control, not just in the health care area but in many other arenas, where even the gao has pointed out again and again there is a lot of room for improvement to rid the system of waste, fraud, and abuse. >>neil: do you think as the president makes his way to the reviewing stand, he is feet from us, literally, from where i am, before he moves to the review youing stand, do you think he is seizing on what he thinks is the advantage over congress and your popularity, collectively, republicans, sir, and he will get his way because you guys have not found yours. what do you say? >> listen, we are in the majority in the house of representatives because the voters of our
. tonko: people have said that there is a need for government, they want effective government, efficient government. well, i think when we look at some of the data that are collected, representative garamendi, it is important for us to acknowledge that as we rebuild in our areas that have been damaged by mother nature, you don't just replace, you need to improve upon the situation. for instance, if there are data that are telling us that more and more water volume is expected in certain watershed areas, as in my district, it would be foolish to spend tax dollars, the hard-earned taxpayer dollars, and simply replace an infrastructure, a bridge, at the same height, at the same span if in fact we know that the water and the force of that water is growing with time. and so these are the ways to, i think, incorporate the soundness of academics and analyses that go into how we respond to this. and if much of it is driven by climate change, global warming, some of the impacts of mother nature that are causing these disruptive scenarios, then ought we not look at sound policy that then stretches
us for so long no longer apply. the question we have today is not whether our government is too big or too small, but whether it works, whether it helps families find jobs at a decent wage, care they can afford, a retirement that is dignified. whether the answer is yes, we intend to move forward. where the answer is no, programs will end. and those of us who manage the public's dollars will be held to account to spend wisely, reform bad habits, and do our business in the light of day because only then can we restore the vital trust between a people and their government. nor is the question before us whether the market is a force for good or ill. its power to generate wealth and expand freedom is unmatched, but this crisis has reminded us that without a watchful eye, the market can spin out of control. a nation cannot prosper long when it favors only the prosperous. the success our economy has always depended not just on the size of our gdp, but on the reach of our prosperity, on our ability to extend opportunity to every willing heart not out of charity, but because it is the surest
, the government stepped in to provide flood insurance to ensure that those mortgages and all the investments were covered against this hazard. a noble idea. forcing governments were very responsive to the people that were selling that flood insurance to did like pay a lot of money for it. so we tended to set rates below which supported the risk. now, the problem with this type of investment scheme is it's like a ponzi scheme. it only gets exposed when disasters happen. on a day-to-day basis, year-to-year basis, as long as you're dealing with those expected quote unquote below 100 year event, which i have no idea however we started calling something 100 year events that started happening every month. the other thing, we have two problems. we can't figure out how to deal with risk and we can't figure out how to communicate. your chance to buy a lottery ticket and winning is less than getting hit with a flood -- flood. most people go out and buy lottery tickets. you would be surprised how many people don't buy flood insurance. we don't do a good job if people don't do this. but the challenge with fl
were forced to limit the growth of their government. every state has prisons, schools but they find a way to fund those for less. those nine states gained population from other states, increase jobs four point* 9%. the other states declined. competition between neighboring states keeps them from indulging. new hampshire kept vermont politicians from going crazy. the existence of arizona and nevada teacher the california legislator from going crazy. they still do despite so many people moving. but it is good we have places like texas. smaller government means >> gregg: fox news alert on the hostage crisis in algeria this hour where the fate of captive americans are not clear. two unarmed predator drones have been on the scene in the middle of the sahara flying over the gas facility taken over by al-qaeda fighters three days ago. on the ground, a bloody conclusion could be playing out right now. algerian forces have stormed the complex calling it a final assault. sources telling fox news the situation might not be over yet. hello, i'm gregg jarrett. glad you are with us. welcome to am
, and the man the government reluctantly accepted as its negotiator walked out of a mountaintop cabin late this afternoon hand in hand. >> he didn't come out. we went in. and we hugged each other. and we kissed the girls and hugged them. and it's a very emotional thing. >> it was 11 days ago when the siege in northern i'd began. weaver, his wife, three kids, and a friend were found hiding in a remote cabin not far from the canadian border. weaver was wanted on charges of selling sawed-off shotguns. there was a shootout, and a federal marshal was killed. the next day weaver's wife was killed. a son killed. and a friend wounded. northern idaho is a hotbed for anti-government sentiment. and as the siege dragged on a vigil of angry supporters watched the authorities' every move. >> so bo gritz, presidential candidate that year, ended up playing this key role in ending this horrible standoff. but the standoff, it lasted for 11 days, and it did become a cause celebre for a very angry portion of the very far right anti-government fringe in this country. that was ruby ridge. less than a year later
lowered their expectations -- there's always debate about what the proper role of government ought to be. i suspect it will have more of that in the coming days about what the proper role government should be -- what are our expectations? are they too low? some of my friends on the right will see the opposite -- the expectations of government are too high. talk to me about expectations -- what do we have a right to the world? >> i think it is important what they were saying about what should be done -- it is not theory, it is actually being done in countries around the world with demonstrated, proven results. every child in many countries in europe start out with that preschool. the results are that unlike this country, there is not hereditary poverty. it is proven -- this is not a theory. what you are saying about the health system is completely proven. our health system costs an extra $750 billion a year for exactly the same services that you would get in other countries. at the institute of medicine issued a report that the waste and fraud that comes from this for-profit system is 5%
to start governing from a con seventive perspective. and i don't know what everybody else said about the deal we're going to do tomorrow but i'm actually ok with what leadership is doing right now because they actually have an agenda. the agenda is to get to balance in 10 years, to have a balanced budge, not just to pass a budget that balances in 10 year bus to actually achieve balance in 10 years. if you look at what we're going to do, we're going to pass a three or four-month extension of the debt ceiling. then we're going to get into a fight on the sequester and hold the line of the sequester. this is a promise the leadership is making to us. as long as they keep that promise i think many conservatives will be ok with that. then when we get to the debt ceiling fight we're going to ask for at a minimum the one--- the one-for-one cuts that come from the boehner rule for any long-term debt ceiling extension system of if we look at that, it means that in 10 to 15 years, with very little help from the democrats, we can achieve a balanced budget which is much better than even the 23- to
. >> aye. >> mr. become governing. >> aye. >> mr. hastings. >> aye. >> mr. poll. >> aye. >> mr. chairman? >> chairman no. for yea's, nine's. the amendment is not agreed to. the gentleman is wreck wreck d recognized. >> mr. chairman i make the move that -- number 73 would provide $125 million toward the emergency watershed protection program. >> is there further discussion? >> vote now be on the amendment say aye. >> aye. >> no. >> no. >> amendment is not agreed to. >> mr. chair, i question a -- >> we ask the clerk to ask for a roll call. >> miss fix. >> no. >> mr. bishop, no. >> mr. kole? >> mr. wood annual no. >> mr. knew gent. >> no. >> mr. webster? no. miss hoytman, no. >> mr. burgess. >> no. >> miss fodder, aye. >> mr. mcgovern. >> aye. >> mr. hays'ings. >> aye. >> mr. poleis. >> aye, mr. came? injury know. clerk will report, four yea's, nine nays. the amendment is not agreed to. we now move to the motions made be the advice chairman of the committee. toness favor say aye. >> aye. >> those opposed, no. the amendment passes, and we would go ahead and recognize mr. coll will be happeni
is all about. people who maintain an almost total skepticism about what government can accomplish for the good of this country. he talked about all the good things government does, whether it's education or it's a safety net or it's regulation when it has to be done in terms of big business. he launched all those good reasons and then he said, of course, there are people who retain a reasonable skepticism about the role of government in this country. that debate is going to continue. i thought that was an amazing effort. he's not going to win any support from the tea party. he might win though, the congressman may know better, he might be able to make some of the people who represent the suburbs who are not so far right realize this guy is not their enemy. he is somewhat to their left but he's probably as reasonable as anybody to their right in terms of politics these days. >> chris -- >> i think the battle today is between people that want government to function, want the debate to continue, and people that want to take their ball and go home and end government, shut it down, use
additional tax incentives. finally, and most important, we should have the federal government lead by example. the department of energy's management of four large marketing agency should be the gold standard for integrating renewables into the grid, upgrading transmission capacity and leading on conservation. the g.s.a., with over 300 million square feet of federal office space, should demand that all our facilities, every one we at least buy or build, should be of the highest energy efficiency. the federal fleet should be on the cutting edge of fuel efficiency standards. and finally, the department of defense, the largest consumer of energy in the world, needs to redouble its efforts. the pentagon is already moving in the right direction, but it's not just about saving money in the long term. it's providing operational flexibility and reducing velarde nurblet from inefficient and dangerous fossil fuels. those fuel tanker trucks in afghanistan and iraq might as well have had great big bull's eyes on them for terrorists. the military knows this, and we should give maximum support even in a tim
, but it has to have a component of the state and government to help foster it, and the line that really stuck out to me was these truths can be self-evident, but they're not self-executing. what he made was a case for why there is an important role for the government to play to basically protect our rights but also to advance us as a society whether it's on climate change, immigration reform, bank regulations, and so on down the list. it was a progressive case, but it wasn't necessarily a big government case. saying there's a mix of -- >> let's talk about some examples. i think you know them. the right wing ideas of rights is leave me alone, i got enough guns here in this house to hold you off for a couple days anyway if the government comes in with helicopters. progressives' idea of rights is a couple young people would like to go to the university of mississippi. it took the federal troops to go in there to get them in the door. a governor named george wallace tried to stop people at the door at the university of alabama, they had to be pushed aside. that's an aggressive communitarian notio
. according to algerian government officials, they are saying that both militants and foreign hostages were killed in today's final attack. the government just in the past two hours or so are coming up with what they call is provisional final death figures. 32 militants they say were killed in the four-day siege and 23 hostages including foreigners. as for the americans we were were just talking to the state department. they are still not putting out numbers. we know that one person died. he from texas. we have been reporting five americans had escaped and we believed the two remaining americans, this is as of last night, were still being held. today the reuters news agency says two americans were freed today but we have no confirmation and no one sells saying that. leon panetta is in london today and has stern words about those he feels was behind this attack. >> at 9/11 we made very clear that nobody is going to attack the united states of america and get away with it. for that reason we have made a commitment that we're going to go after al-qaeda wherever they are. >> reporter: he was as
like that. they keep it for one reason only -- so they can protect themselves against the government. that's what it's all about. host: "the new york times" editorial today weighing in saying the white house has a rare chance to propose and pushed through an agenda for public safety. the assault weapon ban should be renewed and tightened with a special emphasis on those that hold more than 10 rounds. offered by our chaplain, father conroy. chaplain conroy: let us pray. god of the universe, we give us thanks for giving us another day. the people's house gathers today and celebrates in its gathering the wonder of our constitutional form of government. our nation has once again achieved something so often lacking in our world history, the peaceful transition of democratic government. the major change of party in control did not take place, it is still the american experience that our streets are peaceful and winners and losers of elections move on with their lives of dignity. we thank you again for the inspiration of our nation's founders and the legacy they left us with. may the member
of the choice that was made to put in combined sewer systems. narrator: in 1994, the government adopted a combined sewer overflow policy to reduce csos nationwide. cities with combined sewer overflows now face an enforcement action called a consent decree. under a consent decree, a city must reduce pollution levels significantly within a strict time frame or face heavy fines. in 1960, the combined sewer overflows were a perfectly legitimate way of dealing with sewers. woman: the mind set was that, what did it matter if we were sending our waste downstream? water was a good conveyance for pollution. man: sewer systems are installed to reduce public health problems. now what you're doing is transferring the problem, you're transferring it to downstream cities. in addition, cities and towns above pittsburgh were doing the same thing. and then they were affecting the water intakes of pittsburgh. 90% of this region gets its drinking water from those same rivers that we have overflows occurring. hecht: we have sewage overflow with as little as 1/10" inch of rain. and our average storm here is
to pay attention, not just local people but the federal government. it would write letters, do all kinds. no one would pay any attention. the sole rights commission decided that first year it would go out and listen to these people and see what they had to say. they had the power to subpoena anyone. eisenhower said, the reason why i want to get it passed by congress instead of issuing an executive order is because by attorney general tells me that is the only way they can subpoena anybody. given what the problems are, some people may not want to come to testify. so the commission most important power of subpoena. they went and looked all over the place to see what the problems or. they made recommendations that were controversial but seemed to make sense. so after they had been there for a while it was clear they need to be reauthorize to needed to be continued to work on these issues. then of course bell rock crisis and those civil-rights movement started to heat up. it was clear that there was a need. in the commission spent the next few years figuring out what to recommend to the gove
these people -- caller: all these people who are paranoid to think the government is going to take their guns, they probably use a psychological evaluation. if the government wants to take your guns and your assault weapon isn't going to stop them from doing that. a second opinion is, i hear everyone talk about regulating and background checks on handguns, but what about background checks on ammunition and that would cut back criminals. host: i appreciate your time. mental health issue must be handled very carefully. a counselor and nurse should be on every public school site, not guns. and joseph asked, should ptsd prevent owning a firearm. rick on our republican line. what are your thoughts? caller: i appreciate you taking my call. i am a republican, i'm a gun owner, former n.r.a. member and i'm also treated for depression. host: why a former n.r.a. member? caller: the day after the presidential election, i was contacted by the n.r.a. -- if you know anything about the n.r.a., if you are a member, they do contact you quite often, mail, via phone calls, asking for money. and more money. and w
deficits, but he signalled split decisions in an era of divided government. >> progress does not compel us to settle. centuries long debates about the role of government for all time, but it does require us to act in our time. [applause] >> for now decisions are upon us. and we cannot afford to wait. we cannot mistake absolutism for principle or substitute spectacle for politics or treat name calling as reasoned debate. [applause] >> we must act. we must act knowing that our work will be unperfect. we must act knowing that today's victories will be only partial. peter: top republicans issued bipartisan statements in the spirit of the day, but mitch mcconnell, the senate republican leader called federal spending and the debt the transcendent challenge of the great challenges of our day. david: was it president harrison who had a two hour speech at his inauguration that he caught pneumonia. this was one of the quickest speeches i have ever seen before. but bottom line here, the president, a lot of people say it sounded more like an acceptance speech at a convention than it did at an inaugura
this government. we've got to stop lurching from crisis to crisis to crisis, when there's this clear path ahead of us that simply requires some discipline, some responsibility and some compromise. that's where we need to go. that's how this needs to work. major garrett. >> thank you, mr. president. as you well know, sir, finding votes for the debt ceiling can sometimes be complicated. you, yourself, as a member of the senate, voted against a debt ceiling increase. and in previous aspects of american history -- president reagan in 1985, president george herbert walker bush in 1990, president clinton in 1997 -- all signed deficit reduction deals that were contingent upon or in the context of raising the debt ceiling. you, yourself, four times have done that. three times, those were related to deficit reduction or budget maneuvers. what chuck and i and i think many people are curious about is this new, adamant desire on your part not to negotiate, when that seems to conflict with the entire history in the modern era of american presidents and the debt ceiling, and your own history on the debt ceil
government said they released hundreds of hostages but not held in the same place. some were hiding. >> i feel safe at the moment. i won't be happy until i'm in the u.k. and see my family. my heart goes out to the guys that are still there. hopefully they will get home safe. >> reporter: one irish hostage told his brother who then relayed to a british newspaper that he escaped when the fifth vehicle in that convoy was struck by the algerian military. he said that the hostage takers had put bomb belts around some of the hostages, but he managed to get out. >> gregg: jennifer griffin, thanks very much. let's turn to lance armstrong. he has finally admitted for all those years and for all the world to hear that he is a cheat he a fraud and liar and bully. his epic career was complete sham. he came clean in an interview with oprah winfrey confessing he took banned substances to win we're talking about testosterone and human growth hormone. >> did you ever take banned substances or dope? >> yes. >> gregg: for years he denied cheating. he called other people liars trying to ruin their reputatio
raising the debt ceiling gives the government the ability to pay its existing bills. it doesn't create new deficit spending. so not raising the debt ceiling is sort of like a family that's trying to improve its credit rating. families that say, i know how we can save money, we won't pay her credit card bills. it was the sole solution to the debt ceiling in august of 2011 in the u.s. downgraded last time. so all these issues are important and it's very important that congress take necessary action to raise the debt ceiling to avoid a situation where government doesn't pay its bills. >> a number of people have expressed concern about how much of the challenges actually were addressed in a deal, it certainly went part way, but leaves a number of issues still on the table. would you care to raise that as an additional fiscal cliff that is facing us? would you think that it's not as concerning as it was when you raise that term initially? >> as i said the fiscal cliff, if it is allowed to take place, it probably would have traded a recession this year. a good bit of that has been a
on the national mall through the association that governance the national mall. that's a bridge we'll cross when we come to it. but there are a number of civic-minded things to do if we are lucky to have access funds when it is all said and done. >> cnn. how many law enforcement agencies and officers will be involved in the security on the day of the inauguration? and also, how large of an area will be closed off with street closures? >> first, to answer your question, we cannot go into detail as to how many law enforcement officers will be present for the inauguration. and could you repeat your second question for me? >> how many agencies? >> i can't go into detail. >> how much will be closed off. >> we have road closures in effect and i can provide you with information on those. >> [inaudible question] veragets with all events that happen on the capitol complex, we train constantly to address them. as far as specific threats, i can't answer that right now, but just know that united states capitol police with our law enforcement partners have trained constantly in regards to issues that may com
a volley and government. the democrats typically say, well, government can do this or can't do that ask so it's really a series of arguments over the role of government and the second thing i'm curious to know about is how tough they were in a pretty partisan atmosphere. he has gotten tougher over the past couple of years with the opposition. how feist you he is he during the speech. >> things people have picked up in this run up to this inauguration is that the president four years ago in his speech came tout and he actually made a comment about how he was going to to bring an end to the petty grievances and false promises in washington. now four years later was that a false promise? >> yes. i mean, the president, i think, understandably confident and an historic election and all of that perhaps overstated what could be done. this is one place where he seen having come fiercely short and it's in bringing that sense to washington of bipartisanship and of working together and overcoming partisanship and his defenders and supporters will say oh, the republicans have been intransient and smal
the debt limit as the government faces another shut down possibly within weeks. will that happen? >> we need to stop spending. we need to reduce spending. but it would be better if we figure out how to do that in a targeted way, rather than across the board way. look what mommy is having. mommy's having a french fry. yes she is, yes she is. [ bop ] [ male announcer ] could've had a v8. 100% vegetable juice, with three of your daily vegetable servings in every little bottle. of green giant vegetables it's easy to eat like a giant... ♪ and feel like a green giant. ♪ ho ho ho ♪ green giant martha: all right. there was a frightening scene after a plane blew out four tires landing. it happened at newark airport. 13 people were onboard this plane. it was a flight from rochester, new york, to newark. reports are that nobody was hurt. we'll continue to keep a look at that situation. we'll let you know if there is any information on that. looks like everybody is okay. scary situation though. bill: republican senator roy blunt said president obama was confrontational in his first term. tell
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